cute little alligator

adventuresinhires:

One of the things we like about the Internet is that no matter what it is you are interested in, no matter how obscure, no matter how seemingly random, there is someone else out there who is to and you can find them. And you can share what you are interested in with whoever wants to find it. This collection of comic book cartography is case and point. We didn’t know we liked looking at examples of cartography in comic books and now we do.
http://comicbookcartography.posthaven.com/

Shared from www.juxtapoz.com

The art of cinematographer Robby Müller.

serendipitouscontrast:

Geisel Library

serendipitouscontrast:

Geisel Library

francounamerican:

The Geisel Library at the University of California, Whale’s Vagina

francounamerican:

The Geisel Library at the University of California, Whale’s Vagina

tiscopo:

Hanging out at school.

tiscopo:

Hanging out at school.

weareallcliches:

UCSD Geisel Library—Secret Stairs
A view from the inside.
There are tons of breath taking views of the library from outside
but it’s much rarer to find one of the interior.

weareallcliches:

UCSD Geisel Library—Secret Stairs

A view from the inside.

There are tons of breath taking views of the library from outside

but it’s much rarer to find one of the interior.

bathroomsofucsd:

Men’s restroom on the west side (Arts Library) of the 1th, lower floor of Geisel Library (the one shaped like a spaceship)

bathroomsofucsd:

Men’s restroom on the west side (Arts Library) of the 1th, lower floor of Geisel Library (the one shaped like a spaceship)

iowasunshine:

During the July trip to San Diego, one of my must-see stops was the Geisel Library. This fucking library, I can’t even. The building is phenomenal. Unfortunately we got there late enough that by the time we finished taking pictures outside, we only had time to use the restrooms and snap some quick photos of the Dr. Seuss display before they closed. 

lite-blu:

inception snow fortress & geisel library

lite-blu:

inception snow fortress & geisel library

citylightscomebackinjune:

Located on the University of California San Diego campus, the Geisel Library is the main library for the university. Named after Audrey and Theodor Seuss Geisel (AKA Dr. Seuss) who contributed to the library and were residents of La Jolla. Near the entrance of the library, towards the left, there are many different displays of Dr. Seuss’s works as well first drafts of art and writing as well as letters. 

The library’s architecture is something to behold beyond the Geisel’s name. Walking around the building provides a different perspective of how the library is perceived versus the reality of how truly massive the building is.

The entire campus of UCSD is wonderful and worth a visit.

blankgrid:

Geisel Library, UCSD

blankgrid:

Geisel Library, UCSD

robertogreco:

Poto and Cabengo is a 1980 documentary film made by Jean-Pierre Gorin about twin girls Grace and Virginia Kennedy, who used Poto and Cabengo as names for each other.


  Grace and Virginia are young San Diego twins who speak unlike anyone else. With little exposure to the outside world, the two girls have created a private form of communication that’s an amalgam of the distinctive English dialects they hear at home. Jean-Pierre Gorin’s polyphonic nonfiction investigation of this phenomenon looks at the family from a variety of angles, with the director taking on the role of a sort of sociological detective. It’s a delightful and absorbing study of words and faces, mass media and personal isolation, and America’s odd margins.


"Documentary, late 70s, children, parenting, media, language, San Diego (inc. Geisel Library), more." That’s what drew me in and that’s what kept me watching. Grace and Virginia are contemporaries of mine. Their parents overreacted to the comment of a surgeon shortly after their birth. They lived in a bilingual household. The media swarmed around the story, but pretty much dropped it when the facts began to be revealed. And this all took place in San Diego. Their neighborhood for the bulk of the film was Linda Vista, which was becoming increasingly Latino at the time and has gone through additional changes since. The screenshot above comes from a sequence inside the Geisel Library at UCSD, then known as the Central Library. There are also scenes at the San Diego Zoo, at the beach, and driving along SR-163 and other freeways in town.

The film is available as part of the Criterion Collection, on Hulu Plus, and on YouTube (for now, at least). Additional screenshots are available on Tell Ya What.

Side note: in searching for some of the references for this post, I came across Poto and Cabenga (Cabenga, not Cabengo), a 2010 indy video game for the iPhone. I wonder about the name origin.

Update: In 1988, Lynne Tillman interviewed Jean-Pierre Gorin for BOMB Magazine. There is lengthy conversation within about Poto and Cabengo, as well as his other films.

robertogreco:

Poto and Cabengo is a 1980 documentary film made by Jean-Pierre Gorin about twin girls Grace and Virginia Kennedy, who used Poto and Cabengo as names for each other.

Grace and Virginia are young San Diego twins who speak unlike anyone else. With little exposure to the outside world, the two girls have created a private form of communication that’s an amalgam of the distinctive English dialects they hear at home. Jean-Pierre Gorin’s polyphonic nonfiction investigation of this phenomenon looks at the family from a variety of angles, with the director taking on the role of a sort of sociological detective. It’s a delightful and absorbing study of words and faces, mass media and personal isolation, and America’s odd margins.

"Documentary, late 70s, children, parenting, media, language, San Diego (inc. Geisel Library), more." That’s what drew me in and that’s what kept me watching. Grace and Virginia are contemporaries of mine. Their parents overreacted to the comment of a surgeon shortly after their birth. They lived in a bilingual household. The media swarmed around the story, but pretty much dropped it when the facts began to be revealed. And this all took place in San Diego. Their neighborhood for the bulk of the film was Linda Vista, which was becoming increasingly Latino at the time and has gone through additional changes since. The screenshot above comes from a sequence inside the Geisel Library at UCSD, then known as the Central Library. There are also scenes at the San Diego Zoo, at the beach, and driving along SR-163 and other freeways in town.

The film is available as part of the Criterion Collection, on Hulu Plus, and on YouTube (for now, at least). Additional screenshots are available on Tell Ya What.

Side note: in searching for some of the references for this post, I came across Poto and Cabenga (Cabenga, not Cabengo), a 2010 indy video game for the iPhone. I wonder about the name origin.

Update: In 1988, Lynne Tillman interviewed Jean-Pierre Gorin for BOMB Magazine. There is lengthy conversation within about Poto and Cabengo, as well as his other films.

christinetheastrophysicist:

Geiseling it up for the last time this quarter.
Whoot whoot!

christinetheastrophysicist:

Geiseling it up for the last time this quarter.

Whoot whoot!

tiscopo:

Geisel Library at UCSD

tiscopo:

Geisel Library at UCSD

jadenmy:

time to do homework in the library :/

jadenmy:

time to do homework in the library :/